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Old Jun 7th 2017, 09:33 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by Twistedracer View Post
Uh oh , trade time?
I think you said you did 54 degree on left side?

Wow that's far down and probably almost pushing the limit of stock OEM tire?

I think I've been hitting 52 at T Hill East.
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 09:42 AM   #42
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I think your position looks good.
Don't kill yourself trying to look like Marquez out there.
If you watch WSBK, take a look at Rea. He's rides more upright compared to the rest of the field, and he's basically unstoppable.
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 10:04 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by flobrandx View Post
Looking good out there imparting!

I agree, Ken Hill's Podcasts are awesome and full of great info. One thing that Ken does talk about is that body position is lower on his priority list and you can be a very fast rider with less than stellar body position. Bike placement, vision, and brakes are all higher on his list of what to focus on.

For example, take a look at Toprack Razgatlioglu in WSSTK, and you can see his body position doesn't effect how damn fast he is. He just doesn't appear as fluid or exaggerated with his body but it doesn't effect his ability to win.
Agree. More things are important in going fast than body position. However, good BP is helpful for making good pics though...
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 10:16 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by youngR View Post
I think you said you did 54 degree on left side?

Wow that's far down and probably almost pushing the limit of stock OEM tire?

I think I've been hitting 52 at T Hill East.
53 on the left side. But still a little edge left.
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 10:21 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by jmparton View Post
Agree. More things are important in going fast than body position. However, good BP is helpful for making good pics though...
Pics are the most important
I'm bummed the photographer didn't shoot me in T9 Saturday. That's my 53 degree left.
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 10:24 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Twistedracer View Post
Looking at your pics your chest seems 3/4 off the tank. I'm only halfway. I'll work for more.
I wouldn't worry about being that specific. It's like others have said, people are going to have varying styles and style doesn't necessarily preclude how quick you lap a circuit. I have always tried to mimic a "balanced" form on the bike, meaning not too upright but not hanging too far off either. I believe the more important aspects are: where do you have your weight on the bike and where are you relaxed. For example, entering a corner you are upright, and weight on your arms and hands for stability and to get feedback from the front end while braking. As you initiate the turn, your weight then transfers to the inside foot while the arms, especially the inside one, start to relax and the shoulder and head drop. As you start to accelerate, then the weight starts to transition to the outside foot and butt in order to start standing the bike back up and provide feedback from the rear. Anyway, I would focus more on some of these points and I believe the body position will start to come naturally. Looking at your photos, once you start picking up some more speed, you'll make some great pictures.
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 10:27 AM   #47
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53 degrees, a bit of edge left. 26 psi cold.




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Old Jun 7th 2017, 10:48 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by jmparton View Post
I wouldn't worry about being that specific. It's like others have said, people are going to have varying styles and style doesn't necessarily preclude how quick you lap a circuit. I have always tried to mimic a "balanced" form on the bike, meaning not too upright but not hanging too far off either. I believe the more important aspects are: where do you have your weight on the bike and where are you relaxed. For example, entering a corner you are upright, and weight on your arms and hands for stability and to get feedback from the front end while braking. As you initiate the turn, your weight then transfers to the inside foot while the arms, especially the inside one, start to relax and the shoulder and head drop. As you start to accelerate, then the weight starts to transition to the outside foot and butt in order to start standing the bike back up and provide feedback from the rear. Anyway, I would focus more on some of these points and I believe the body position will start to come naturally. Looking at your photos, once you start picking up some more speed, you'll make some great pictures.
Balance on the R feels very good. Very comfortable heeled over to my left. In fact on the long left T9 my inside hand just rests lightly on the bar. T9's length makes it easier to spend time on body position. Now T7 I definitely need to get more consistent on body position.

Prescription: More track time.
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 11:28 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by Twistedracer View Post
Uh oh , trade time?
Lol.. no, not yet.. eventually for sure!
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Old Jun 7th 2017, 07:28 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by gramps View Post
As others have said I'm no Rossi but I have learned a lot from YCRS. The video below shows some of the things that have helped me and the model isn't bad either. Pay close attention to inside foot position. That one thing made a big difference in body position. Especially with a higher peg position.


Umm where they talking bikes? All I heard was Jennifer.

I guess I've been reading most of Nicks stuff throughout my life. I've been practicing what he was talking about.
Interestingly is what's been said about braking and body position. These days everyone is talking about squeezing the tank while braking and using things like Stompgrip or Techspec.
Going into the braking zone I've already shifted into position for the corner so there's no squeezing the tank. Ken and Nick reinforced that I'm doing this part right.

Now back to Jennifer........
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