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Old Oct 10th 2015, 08:37 AM   #11
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Which cable in particular?

I thought about altering the cable, the longest one which runs from O2 sensor plug to controller input, but I couldn't find my 9V battery to power up the multimeter to check the pins. They do make shorter cables a three foot one, for $30 each.

I would have rather had that from the get go.

Right now I'm thinking about routing the O2 sensors cable to the left side of the bike and mounting everything under the battery, and routing the controller output cable, which connects to the bike's O2 sensor inputs on the main harness, between the radiator and horizontal cylinder.
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Old Oct 11th 2015, 12:14 PM   #12
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Holy shit what an epic pain in the ass. I'm just leaving this trail of breadcrumbs for anyone else who is unfortunate enough to buy two wideband kits and install them and run into the same wall.

So when you buy the WB kit from Tuneboy, a plug matching that of the OEM NB O2 sensor is included. The idea is that you plug the controller into the main harness, and the WB O2 into the controller. Seems easy.

I do all of that, get everything packaged away nicely...even the ridiculous 8' cable. Before auto tuning I did a high speed log to make sure it was capturing good data. The problem was is that the Tuneboy Trim program was seeing my A/F ratio at something ghastly like 10:1. Bike runs fine though. It was almost like the Trim program was seeing the O2 sensor output as if it were a narrow band sensor, which it wasn't.

I re-read the manual and begin double checking things.

I check the plugs and notice the brown wire (analog 2) is fed into the main harness, not the yellow wire (analog 1). I had to go buy a serial adapter for this next part...and why the F is anyone still using serial connections? Its 2015...but anyway. I plug in the serial output of the controller into my laptop and fire up the LM Programmer software. This allows you to view and set the parameters of the controller. I discover that analog 2, the brown wire, is setup to look like a narrow band sensor. So at 13.2:1 there is just under 1 volt being fed upstream. Now, because the Trim program was thinking this was the sensor output of a WB sensor, it interpreted this output as something like 10.0:1. If you've seen one of those voltage charts for narrow band sensors, like I've attached below, it will make sense.

The solution. Using the LM Programmer, I was able to change the parameters of the analog 2 output to match what a WB sensor's output would be. Fired the bike up and now the Trim program sees a nice 13.2:1.

FML.
Attached Thumbnails
LC-1 wide band oxygen sensor install-nb-chart.jpg   LC-1 wide band oxygen sensor install-wb-chart.jpg  
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Last edited by bp7178; Oct 11th 2015 at 05:04 PM.
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Old Oct 11th 2015, 05:05 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by bp7178 View Post
Which cable in particular?

I thought about altering the cable, the longest one which runs from O2 sensor plug to controller input, but I couldn't find my 9V battery to power up the multimeter to check the pins. They do make shorter cables a three foot one, for $30 each.

I would have rather had that from the get go.

Right now I'm thinking about routing the O2 sensors cable to the left side of the bike and mounting everything under the battery, and routing the controller output cable, which connects to the bike's O2 sensor inputs on the main harness, between the radiator and horizontal cylinder.
Correct, I was thinking the O2 sensor cable. I was watching a video article on a/f ratio meters and it mentioned that most are not designed for specialty fuels like ethanol etc, some of which have richer a/f ratios but the meter is thinking gasoline and giving out incorrect readings. I must find the video and share the advice.
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Old Oct 11th 2015, 08:50 PM   #14
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I left the O2 sensor cables alone, but I did shorten the 8' cable tonight. An epic pain in the ass...again. Some of the wires are shielded inside the outer jacket, so you have to work with that. I've included a pin diagram below. Some of the pins on the controller side connect to more than one. There are also two yellow wires. My advise to anyone who tries to do this is to take your time, use solder connections and individually heat shrink them, and heat shrink the whole thing. You should have plenty of the aluminium shielding to wrap around the protected wires. Basically, all the ones other than red or blue. Which I suspect are the heater circuit wires.

The stoichiometric A/F value is different, even between gasoline, E10, E15, and of course E85. The E85 has to run super rich, and obviously each is more progressively enriched as ethanol is added.

There isn't a gas pump around here that doesn't read "may contain up to 10% ethanol". After I work all this out and may try a trim table using values for E10 and see how the bike responds. Obviously, back to back dyno testing would be the way to go.

A lambda of 1.0 is always where given fuel is stoichiometric. Through the Logworks program, you can actually change A/F ratio which matches the stoichiometric value of the fuel you are using; it defaults to 14.7:1. I suspect this is so you can setup a narrow band type sensor and use that narrow target range for different fuels.

From what I can tell, the Trim program is using A/F values, not lambda. So if one were to know where 10% ethanol gas produced the most power, this could be accounted for. I can't remember where I got this chart from, but it was within a pretty detailed word document about the differences of ethanol blended fuels.
Attached Thumbnails
LC-1 wide band oxygen sensor install-lambda.jpg   LC-1 wide band oxygen sensor install-plugs.jpg  
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Last edited by bp7178; Nov 2nd 2015 at 06:39 PM.
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Old Nov 2nd 2015, 10:30 AM   #15
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Nevermind didn't see the chart above

Last edited by rpm429; Nov 2nd 2015 at 10:37 AM.
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Old Feb 8th 2016, 12:20 AM   #16
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I am running an Akrapovic Full exhaust with Tuneboy. I purchased two LC-2 controllers and started stripping my bike in preparation for the install.

The first problem i ran into is the adapters don't fit the Akrapovic heat shield. This needs to be cut a little to make room for the adapter and sensor.

The second problem are the cables from controller to sensor which are 8 feet long and pretty thick. I don't see why these are made this long and where i should route them. Is there another solution for this without having to trim the cables? I know they sell 3 feet cables which would be easier to route. How have others fixed this? Do you trim the cables and to what length? Or do you just purchase the shorter 3 feet cables?
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band, install, lc-1, lc1, oxygen, sensor, tuneboy, wide, wide band



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