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Old Feb 8th 2015, 05:44 PM   #1
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I Ride: Panigale 1199 R, Ducati 916SP, '05 Gixxer w/BST's & CMC rotors, Ohlins
Installing the 24 degree kit w/pics

This a much bigger job than installing my Termi exhaust system partly because of the BRUTE FORCE and the need to be exact when lining up the tabs for the housings.

1. Take long ride to drain tank.
2. Press in bearing race and seals then measure /mark housings for upper/lower directions.
3. Buy new ratchet and w/1” tie down straps.
4. Staple celluloid strip to end of strap to feed it in using side fairings to feel for it.
5. Put bike on Pit Bull rear stand.
6. Put front end on front fork stand/
7. Remove key guard and cover tank w/pad.
8. Remove front calipers and wheel to get new tire mounted.
9. Remove front fender, brake line/ABS bracket, and ABS line from fender clips and fork.
10. Remove two screws from shield under lower triple clamp.
11. Remove upper triple clamp.
12. Loosen clipons and hang from upper fairing holes by mirror stalks.
13. Use special Ducati tool to slightly loosen center nut.
14. Replace front axle.
15. Tighten ratchet to lift bike and remove front stand.
16. One person below holds fork legs.
17. Top person removes upper central nut.
18. Gradually lower forks from airbox/frame bearings while flexing lower shield from under nose fairing. And disconnect plugs from horn.
19. Place fork assembly on ground covering lower bearing and protect radiator.
20. On top, remove upper bearing shield and bearing.
21. Using 11”+ drift and big hammer to knock out lower bearing housing.
22. Clean inside of frame.
23. Use drift and hammer to knock out upper bearing housing.
24. Carefully line up tabs for correct direction and drive in upper housing.
25. Carefully line up tabs for correct direction and drive in lower housing.
26. Grease lower and upper bearing race and bearings.
27. Lift fork assembly while flexing shield under fairing and pull down flappers while top person puts nut on finger tight.
28. Replace two screws under fork shield. Reattach horn plugs.
29. Replace fender w/hoses and lines, and ABS.
30. Put front stand under forks.
31. Tighten top nut to 25 Nm.
32. Replace triple clamp by driving on w/wooden drift.
33. Tighten screws to 22 Nm.
34. Key up clipons and tighten to 22Nm.
35. Install front wheel and calipers. Check tire pressure.
36. Torque axle nut to 63 Nm.
37. Loosen straps and remove.
38. Remove front stand and compress forks w/brakes on and torque caliper bolts to 44 Nm.
39. Tighten allen screws under forks to 19 Nm.

“Thirty nine Steps” like the old movie and the same number of steps to remove the Ford engine from my Pantera to put in a 418 cu. in. Donovan aluminum Chevrolet engine.

This is a job that can be done w/simple tools plus Ducati tool for top nut. I had the benefit of shop and parts manual. Many shortcuts were used such as: no bodywork or tank removed except key guard; leaving parts in place like the clip-ons so that no hoses or cables were disconnected; and keeping lower triple attached to forks.

I had the bearing race pressed into the carrier done by a pro but using the chill and heat method it should go together without much force. If you remove your own wheel for tires then the job should be doable. An extra hand (unskilled) is helpful to remove and replace top nut of the forks.

I was surprised by the amount of force required to drive out the old bearing housing. I didn’t use heat because of the close proximity to critical areas. Pre-measuring the housing to determine top and bottom direction is critical before installing. The top hole should be slightly more to the front of the bike and the bottom hole should be slightly towards the rear of bike. .5 of a degree is not much. Mark them!

Maybe, if I was doing the job of driving in the bearing housings again, I might apply hot, wet sand in a sock to the airbox/frame and freeze the carriers to help ease the install. As it was, much precise hammer-driving w/a wooden drift was necessary to line up the locating tabs to seat the carrier.

If a shop did the work I’d estimate four (4) hours plus parts to do the job. A dealer might want more time/&$!
Attached Thumbnails
Installing the 24 degree kit w/pics-20150205_154750.jpg   Installing the 24 degree kit w/pics-20150205_154848.jpg   Installing the 24 degree kit w/pics-20150206_145434.jpg  
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Last edited by Doug916SP; Feb 16th 2015 at 10:34 PM. Reason: More info
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Old Feb 8th 2015, 06:14 PM   #2
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Excellent write up, and convincing argument (for me anyway) to let someone else do it.

Nothing here seems terribly difficult, but am imagining trying to do the job with my 3 and 5 year old boys "helping daddy".

B
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Old Feb 15th 2015, 01:17 PM   #3
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I Ride: Panigale 1199 R, Ducati 916SP, '05 Gixxer w/BST's & CMC rotors, Ohlins
Road Ride Report

ROAD TEST RESULTS- 2013 Panigale R w/CMC Ceramic rotors, Motoholder seat support, New front tire, swingarm in –2mm position (as before change), and lighter quick change sprocket.

Riding my familiar backroads, I evaluated the effects of the 24 degree fork angle change.

High speeds (triple digit) under acceleration and maintaining over smooth, rippling, and undulating road: No “speed wobbles” or twitchiness. At least, no more than before change!

Tight corners, Esses, and switchback roads: Quicker turn-in (as I expected), greater ability to hold tight line, and no understeer (tendency to run wide on exit), much better drive out of corner. Much better side-to-side moves in esses. No instability!

Conclusion: Make the change if you ride an "R".
Attached Thumbnails
Installing the 24 degree kit w/pics-dscn4257.jpg  
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Last edited by Doug916SP; Feb 17th 2015 at 05:41 PM. Reason: Clarification
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Old Feb 15th 2015, 01:56 PM   #4
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I Ride: 1199 ABS, K1300S, ZX7R
Originally Posted by Doug916SP View Post
ROAD TEST RESULTS- 2013 Panigale R w/CMC Ceramic rotors, Motoholder seat support, New front tire, swingarm in –2mm position (as before change), and lighter quick change sprocket.

Riding my familiar backroads, I evaluated the effects of the 24 degree fork angle change.

High speeds (triple digit) under acceleration and maintaining over smooth, rippling, and undulating road: No “speed wobbles” or twitchiness. At least, no more than before change!

Tight corners, Esses, and switchback roads: Quicker turn-in (as I expected), greater ability to hold tight line, and no understeer (tendency to run wide on exit), much better drive out of corner. Much better side-to-side moves in esses. No instability!

Conclusion: Make the change! Especially if you ride an "R".
How many hours for a shop to do this do you think?
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Old Feb 16th 2015, 04:19 AM   #5
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Typically Italian - every episode must be high drama
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Old Feb 16th 2015, 10:50 PM   #6
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I Ride: Panigale 1199 R, Ducati 916SP, '05 Gixxer w/BST's & CMC rotors, Ohlins
See edited post on top.
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Old Feb 17th 2015, 12:05 AM   #7
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Hej Doug916SP
Thank you so much for this.

You've done a man's job, sir.
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Old Feb 17th 2015, 01:11 PM   #8
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I Ride: Panigale 1199 R, Ducati 916SP, '05 Gixxer w/BST's & CMC rotors, Ohlins
Thank you. And thanks for the clip of my favorite film (in all it's versions).
Doug
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Old Feb 17th 2015, 01:34 PM   #9
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Dumb question. Could this be done on a base model?
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Old Feb 17th 2015, 01:53 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by b9009b View Post
Dumb question. Could this be done on a base model?
why not? frame and all chassis components are the same.
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